HPV & Cervical Smears

Cervical screening 

Nearly all women with smear abnormalities have had HPV in the cervix, vagina or vulva. Many women are concerned about the link between cervical cancer and HPV, but an abnormal cervical smear hardly ever means cervical cancer.

Cervical cancer can be prevented by the HPV vaccine and having regular cervical screening.

Cervical screening is also commonly known as a “Pap smear” or “smear test” but is now called cervical screening.

From the age of 20 all women are encouraged to receive regular cervical screening, the main focus of the HPV screening programme is to pick up on the increased risk of developing cervical cancer well before any actual danger manifests.

The primary function of cervical screening is to detect pre-cancerous cell changes of the cervix – not to test for an HPV infection.

Changes to cells in the cervix happen very slowly – so by having regular cervical screening, any abnormal cells will be found and treated long before they become cancer.

The smear test involves taking cells from the surface of the cervix and then examining them to see if they are normal or have changed in some way. If some cells have changed, the test will indicate how they have changed and what the risks are.

It is from a cervical smear that most women usually find out that they have HPV, however, others will find out because they have developed genital warts. It is impossible to know how HPV is transmitted to any particular person even through cervical screening.

It is hard to view an abnormal smear test as a good thing, but on the positive side regular screening picks up early changes that can be monitored and treated. 

 

Click here for a printable pamphlet - Cervical Smears and the Human Papillomavirus Infection (HPV)

 

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HPV Project New Zealand

The NZ HPV Project is supported by: 

  • An educational grant from New Zealand District Health Boards
  • CSL Biotherapies Ltd NZ for an educational grant contributing to optimisation.

Brought to you by the Sexually Transmitted Infections Education Foundation (STIEF). 

For information or advice on where to seek help, please get in touch.

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CONTACT US


New Zealand HPV Project
C/- Sexually Transmitted Infections Education Foundation Inc (STIEF)

PO Box 2437, Shortland Street,
Auckland 1140, New Zealand

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