HPV Vaccine Side Effects

Are there any HPV vaccine side effects?

The HPV vaccine is very safe for both males and females, and no different from other common vaccines. The most common side effect is soreness at the injection site. Millions of doses of the HPV vaccine have now been given all over the world. Extensive research with millions of participants shows that Gardasil/HPV vaccine does not increase the risk for any serious condition and is very safe for all ages, male or female. As with all medicines and vaccines, global ongoing surveillance continues to monitor safety.

As with any medication, vaccines carry an extremely rare risk of an anaphylactic reaction. The rate with Gardasil is around 3 per one million doses. Vaccinators are trained to manage these events.

HPV vaccine reduces HPV-related disease. Some myths have suggested that the vaccine made existing infections worse. This is not true. Studies show no worsening of pre-existing diseases. 

 

What are possible adverse reactions to the HPV Vaccine?

As with all immunisations, people may have a sore arm and get redness, pain and swelling at the injection site.

Other less common reactions include vomiting or fainting. These can follow any immunisation and people should remain seated for 20 minutes (to reduce the risk of injury from falling if they faint).

It’s also a good idea for people to eat breakfast and lunch and avoid excessive exercise on the day they receive the immunisation.

Other possible reactions that can occur, usually within 1–2 days, include:

  • a fever (feeling hot)
  • headache
  • general discomfort (feeling unwell, aches and pains)
  • skin reaction, rash.

Very rarely, a serious allergic reaction (like a peanut allergy) called anaphylaxis occurs, usually within 10 minutes of immunisation. Anaphylaxis can occur with any medicine or vaccine.

If anaphylaxis does occur, it can be treated. For this reason, children are asked to wait for 20 minutes after immunisation. Every vaccinator is trained and equipped to deal with such a reaction.

Preventing HPV cancers by vaccination pamphlet

Preventing HPV cancers by vaccination: what everyone should know

About HPV Virus

About HPV Virus

HPV is thought to be the most common sexually transmitted infection (STI) in the world, and most people are infected with HPV at some time in their…
HPV Key Facts

HPV Key Facts

HPV infection - key information – Vaccination against HPV has been available for many years. 80% of unvaccinated adults will pick up HPV at some point…
HPV Strains

HPV Strains

Papilloma is a word that means a small wart-like growth on the skin or mucous membrane. There are many types of papilloma infections - even some that…
HPV & Cancer

HPV & Cancer

While HPV is an extremely common infection, and there is a link between HPV and cervical, anal, penile, some vulval and throat cancers, it is…
HPV & Throat Cancer

HPV & Throat Cancer

HPV is transmitted to your mouth by oral sex. It may also be possible to get oral HPV in other ways. An increased number of oral sex partners…
HPV & Cervical Cancer

HPV & Cervical Cancer

Some types of HPV are linked to abnormal cell changes on the cervix which place women at higher risk of abnormal cervical smears and developing…
HPV & Other Cancers

HPV & Other Cancers

HPV and penile cancer – HPV-related penile cancers most often affect the ‘head’ of the penis and are rare. HPV and anal cancer – HPV-associated anal…
FAQ

FAQ

Frequently asked questions and key facts about HPV – Human Papillomavirus – FAQ's
HPV & Relationships

HPV & Relationships

The emotional impact of finding out that you or your partner has an STI can sometimes be worse than the actual infection. It’s really important to…